“Why shouldn’t we rule ourselves again? It was the dragons we bowed to! And now the dragons are dead! There sits the only king I mean to bend my knee to: the King in the North!”

A nice quote by Jon Umber (often called The Greatjon), and a great model to paint as well from the game A Song of Ice & Fire by CMON. In this tutorial, we will be painting where we left off in this tutorial. Check it out of you’re interested in getting quick detail into large amounts of miniatures, it covers priming, washing or shading, and dry brushing of the models. The result of these steps should look something like this:

I usually start off painting areas that are hard to reach, to prevent me from doing over a lot of colors when I mess up. To mess up is not a problem, because you can always paint over the mistake, but knowing there are so many miniatures that still need painting I like to plan my time as efficient as possible. In this case, I started with the red piece of clothing using Abomination Gore. Now usually I water down my paint a bit and put down a few coats of paint to make sure the result looks even and clean. But because the miniatures are already pre-shaded and highlighted following the tutorial mentioned above, I only had to put down one coat of paint and the previous effects would still be visible. This is great because now I don’t necessarily need to go back to put down a wash or highlight, saving me time and giving me a result I’m happy with. The next parts I painted were the sleeves and some detail on the armor for which I used Desert Yellow and Monster Brown.

I decided to go for a darker brown: Oak Brown for the boots, straps, and belts so there would be a nice contrast with lighter browns and yellows used so far. For the armor, I decided to go with Gun Metal, this is usually my go-to paint when it comes to painting with The Army Painter metallics. It’s a great mid tone which allows you to make it darker using washes and highlight it using lighter metallics.

I went back to Monster Brown to add some more of it on the handle of the sword and the straps on the back, followed by some Kobold Skin for the face. Then it came to my attention that the “skirt” Jon is wearing should be metallic too. So I carefully went in there again with Gun Metal trying not to hit attributes I already painted. You should definitely try to do this in an earlier stage as it will be easier to reach.

After that, I went back to Oak Brown for his hair. For the last pieces of the base coat, I took out Monster Brown again to paint the fur hanging from Jons shoulders and finished it off using Mummy Robes for the horn.

The hardest part is done now, and it’s time to get that extra definition in with a few washes. I used Strong Tone, which is a dark brown wash for the brown areas like the hair, the fur, straps, boots, and horn. A mild brown/red tone called Flesh Wash was used for… you guessed it, the face.

The last wash I’m using is Dark Tone. It’s the darkest tone in The Army Painter range of washes and I think it’s perfect for any armor or metallics. Now that the armor is toned down a bit, the last thing I want to do before I call it finished is highlight some of the metallics like the edges of the sword and raised areas of the armor using Shining Silver.

So this is what the end result looks like, I’m quite satisfied as I think the result looks great considering we took some shortcuts using the method of only putting down one base coat and letting the shades and highlights come through using the techniques described in the earlier mentioned tutorial.

Paints used in the previous tutorial:

Paints used for this tutorial:

 Artist: Rick